Life

Oh the pressure, part four

If you’re wondering what happened to Parts 1, 2, and 3, they appeared in this column a year ago when I subjected myself to the pressure of an eight-hour playwriting competition at Femfest in Winnipeg.

Yes, there was always something needing to be built at Delta. (From Les Green's album)

Delta dreams: Chapter three

This is a continuation of the story of how the family spent twenty or more summers at our precious cottage at Delta Beach, enjoying life on the beach and hammering together our second home.

(QMI Agency photos)

Canada's oddest big roadside attractions

From the big nickel in Sudbury, Ont., to a giant Vincent van Gogh painting in Altona, Man., to the giant lobster in Shediac, N.B., Canada's highways are lined with some incredibly large, incredibly odd attractions.

A cyclist climbs a street towards the Brussels' Palace of Justice (back C) and the Marolles elevator (L), an urban elevator connecting the lower and higher levels of the district, August 3, 2015. Once the last refuge of lepers and criminals, one of Brussels' quirkiest neighbourhoods teems with vintage furniture sellers, flea markets and linguistic invention. Les Marolles in French, or de Marollen in Dutch, stretches from the Gare du Midi, where Eurostar trains arrive, to the city's highest point, the Mont des Pendus or Galgenberg (Gallows Hill), where you can look down on half of Brussels. Picture taken August 3, 2015. REUTERS/Francois Lenoir

An ever-changing Brussels district

Once the last refuge of lepers and criminals, one of Brussels' quirkiest neighbourhoods teems with vintage furniture sellers, flea markets and linguistic invention.

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