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Cowboys running back Joseph Randle finds himself in more trouble

By Bill Lankhof, Toronto Sun

Cowboys running back Joseph Randle. (USA Today Sports)

Cowboys running back Joseph Randle. (USA Today Sports)

So, you have to wonder what now?

For the Dallas Cowboys.

For DeMarco Murray, the franchise single-season rushing record holder.

And for Joseph Randle, the franchise’s single-season leading pinhead.

Where Murray ends up is still pure speculation.

Randle? Well, that’s simple. He’s back in the doghouse.

It looked like he’d get an opportunity to become heir to the running-back position if Murray took the free-agent leap.

Instead, all he’s airing is more dirty laundry.

Wichita police have dropped a drug charge, levied earlier this week, against Randle. That’s the good news.

But this is a silver lining with a dark cloud, making what happens with the Cowboys backfield one of the more intriguing issues this off-season.

Much of Dallas’ success these days relies on the ground game. So, they need Murray. Or, they need some reasonable facsimile. And, Randle looked as if he could compete to be that facsimile. After all, he gained 343 yards on 51 carries last season for a 6.7-yard average and had 11 runs of 10 yards or more.

So, he can run; but too much of it has come running from police. Running from mall security. Running from responsibility.

The problem with Randle starts from the neck up.

Last year he stole cologne and underwear from a store. Then insulted the arresting cops. Dumb and dumber.

This week, the 23-year-old was arrested when officers received a call for domestic violence with a weapon. They found Randle and the mother of his child at a hotel and observed marijuana in the room, which was rented to Randle.

Dalia Jacobs said she was at the hotel so Randle could visit with his son, who — instead of the standard Frostie with the Kid’s Meal — got guns, drugs and cops.

That’s no recipe for a happy ending. And, there wasn’t one.

Jacobs has filed a protection from abuse order, asking the court to keep Randle away from her after he became agitated, allegedly waved a gun, threatened to shoot out her tires, then punched out her car window.

Does this sound like the kind of guy you’d want to entrust with the back of your franchise quarterback? Just wondering.

“I just couldn’t imagine seeing my son get shot by his own father,” Jacobs told a Wichita radio station.

“Joseph puts his gun up. He walks back to the car, he looks in it, and then he just punches it with his fist. Glass splatters everywhere. There’s glass in my son’s hair. It hit him and that’s when he starts crying.”

So, Randle finds himself a central figure in another bizarre tale, and, in light of the league’s new domestic-abuse policy, one which might not disappear so easily as the wisp of contraband cologne.

A FINE MESS

A little salt for that wound, Mr. Irvin?

Seahawks linebacker Bruce Irvin has been fined $10,000 for starting the brouhaha in the final seconds of their Super Bowl loss.

Seattle defensive lineman Michael Bennett, and New England tight ends Rob Gronkowski and Michael Hoomanawanui, were each fined $8,628 for hitting opponents.

Irvin, ejected after throwing a Patriots player to the ground, later apologized.

TALKING POINTS

Adrian Peterson got his day in court Friday.

Again.

U.S. district judge David Doty heard arguments from the NFL Players Association (on behalf of the Vikings running back) and the NFL. Peterson is asking Doty to overturn the suspension handed down by commissioner Roger Goodell nearly three months ago after Peterson pleaded no contest in court to a misdemeanor, resulting from him using a switch to punish his four-year-old son.

That suspension was upheld by an NFL arbitrator and Peterson currently won’t be eligible for reinstatement until April.

“I felt like a got a fair hearing, for once. I appreciate all the support from my fans,” Peterson told reporters, as he and his wife, Ashley, left the courthouse.

Doty could overturn the arbitrator’s decision, uphold the arbitration process, or send it back to arbitration. Peterson said he hopes to return to the Vikings next season.

A TOUGH CROWD

Murder is no joke.

The judge at the trial of Aaron Hernandez reminded his defence lawyer of that Friday — the same day the jury was given a tour of the home of the former Patriots star.

James Sultan was questioning a state police trooper about tire pressure when, in joking reference to Deflategate, asked whether the trooper had ever received “training in football deflation devices.”

The judge suggested Sultan cut the stand-up act.

Hernandez is accused of the 2013 killing of Odin Lloyd, who was dating the sister of his fiancée.

QUICK HITS

The Raiders have named Ken Norton Jr., who spent the past five seasons as a linebacker coach in Seattle, as their defensive coordinator. Oakland head coach Jack Del Rio and Norton were team-mates in Dallas in the early ’90s ... Steelers running back Le’Veon Bell got 15 months of probation for his arrest last August on marijuana possession and DUI charges. Bell likely faces up to a two-game NFL suspension ... Sam Adams, 41, a former all-Pro defensive tackle has been charged with tax fraud and stealing more than $7,000 in wages from his employees at his fitness clubs. The Washington State attorney’s office claims he failed to pay hundreds of thousands of dollars in sales tax that was collected from customers.​

 


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